A blog for young readers (and YA lovers) from the Providence Athenaeum.

The Providence Athenaeum is a unique library and cultural center in the heart of Providence, Rhode Island. Growing out of the Providence Library Company (fourth library in the United States), the Athenaeum as we know it was formed in 1836. Our handsome building on the corner of Benefit and College was completed in 1838.

We are one of the few surviving membership libraries in the nation. Student memberships are available - visit or call for more information.

This blog is updated by one of our circulation assistants (and YA enthusiast), Amy. Follow us to find out what's new in our Young Adult corner, or just for a daily dose of literary shenanigans.

You can follow the Ath on twitter or facebook. Our catalog and much more information about us can be found at our homepage.

 

cheshirelibrary:

Writes of Passage - 50 Books That Will Change Your Life

[via worldbookday.com]

Young people and adults nominated the books that have rocked their worlds, to help us create the ultimate list of 50 BOOKS that will change YOUR life and keep you reading…

Book-Cut Artworks by Thomas Allen

via fer1972

One of these is the cover of a Thursday Next novel, I think.

bignazo:

The BIG NAZO Intergalactic Mobile Creature Band plays the streets of Downtown Ottawa on it’s way to the BluesFest Festival site. July 2014

Photo: Glorbo

Some days I’m just really proud to be from Providence.

New to the YA Corner

PANTOMIME and SHADOWPLAY by Laura Lam

Books 1 & 2 of the Micah Grey series

PANTOMIME:

R.H. Ragona’s Circus of Magic is the greatest circus of Ellada. Nestled among the glowing blue Penglass – remnants of a mysterious civilisation long gone – are wonders beyond the wildest imagination. It’s a place where anything seems possible, where if you close your eyes you can believe that the magic and knowledge of the vanished Chimeras is still there. It’s a place where anyone can hide.

SHADOWPLAY:

Micah and the white clown, Drystan, take refuge with the once-great magician, Jasper Maske. When Maske agrees to teach them his trade, his embittered rival challenges them to a duel which could decide all of their fates.

People also hunt both Micah and the person he was before the circus–the runaway daughter of a noble family. And Micah discovers there is magic and power in the world, far beyond the card tricks and illusions he’s perfecting…

The biggest issue with equating the library with a Netflix for books is that it sends a false message that libraries are worth little more than $8 or $12 or $20 a month. That the services offered in libraries are little more than options to which people can subscribe, rather than actual services anyone can utilize at any time.

When the library is made to be seen as a business, rather than the heart of a community or a fundamental service made possible through citizen-approved tax dollars, it makes the library expendable. That expendability then moves down the chain: staff salaries get cut, then staff withers, then more programs and projects that benefit the community — books and movies and CDs and magazines and newspapers and wifi and computer access and database subscriptions and programs for all shapes, colors, and sizes of people — disappear, too. It detracts from the unique aspects that make a library what it is: a place for all, rather than a place for some.

Libraries reach out where Netflix reaches in.

from Libraries Are Not a “Netflix” for Books.  (via catagator)

Definitely go read the whole post, because YES. Also: I love you, libraries. I appreciate Netflix (er, sometimes), but I will never love it with the fiery heat of a thousand suns combined with the love of all books (but separate to prevent an Alexandria situation) because it is no YOU.

(via gwendabond)

bookpatrol:

Holy Bookworm, Batman !*!*!
They call him The Bookworm. His crimes are derived from his reading list and his preferred mode of transportation is, of course, a book mobile. He is one of the smartest villains in the Batman lexicon.
The 1966 episode was called ‘The Bookworm Turns‘ and starred Roddy MacDowell. Originally slated for 3 three episodes only this one saw the light of day.
 
 

bookpatrol:

Holy Bookworm, Batman !*!*!

They call him The Bookworm. His crimes are derived from his reading list and his preferred mode of transportation is, of course, a book mobile. He is one of the smartest villains in the Batman lexicon.

The 1966 episode was called ‘The Bookworm Turns‘ and starred Roddy MacDowell. Originally slated for 3 three episodes only this one saw the light of day.